Thursday, February 21st, 2019  |  10:12 AM

A Conservative Newspaper Promoting,
Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness

Subscribe Now: Get your own copy of The US Journal

George Washington's Rules of Civility Part Two

Written By: George Washington  |  Posted: Monday, September 27th, 2010

40 Strive not with your superior in argument, but always submit your argument to others with modesty.
41 Undertake not to teach your equal in the art himself professes; it (manuscript damaged ) of arrogance.
42 [damaged manuscript]; and same with a clown and a prince,
43 Do not express joy before one sick in pain, for that contrary passion will aggravate his misery.
44 When a man does all he can, though it succeed not well, blame not him that did it.
45 Being to advise or reprehend any one, consider whether it ought to be in public or in private, and presently or at some other time; in what terms to do it; and in reproving show no signs of cholor but do it with all sweetness and mildness.
46 Take all admonitions thankfully in what time or place soever given, but afterwards not being culpable take a time and place convenient to let him know it that gave them.
47 Mock not nor jest at any thing of importance. Break no jests that are sharp, biting, - and if you deliver any thing witty and pleasant, abstain from laughing thereat yourself.
48 Where in [wherein] you reprove another be unblameable yourself, -for example is more prevalent than precepts,
49 Use no reproachful language against any one; neither curse nor revile.
50 Be not hasty to believe flying reports to the disparagement of any.

51 Wear not your clothes foul, or ripped, or dusty, but see they be brushed
once every day at least and take heed that you approach not to any uncleanness.
52 In your apparel be modest and endeavor to accommodate nature, rather than to procure admiration; keep to the fashion of your equals, such as are civil and orderly with respect to time and places.
53 Run not in the streets, neither go too slowly, nor with mouth open; go not shaking of arms, nor upon the toes, nor in a dancing [damaged manuscript].
54 Play not the peacock, looking every where about you, to see if you be well decked, if your shoes fit well, if your stockings sit neatly and clothes handsomely.
55 Eat not in the streets, nor in your house, out of season.
56 Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
57 In walking up and down in a house, only with one in company if he be greater than yourself, at the first give him the right hand and stop not till he does and be not the first that turns, and when you do turn let it be with your face towards him; if he be a man of great quality walk not with him cheek by jowl but somewhat behind him but yet in such a manner that he may easily speak to you.
58 Let your conversation be without malice or envy, for 'tis a sign of a tractable and commendable nature, and in all causes of passion permit reason to govern.
59 Never express anything unbecoming, nor act against the rules before your inferiors.
60 Be not immodest in urging your friends to discover a secret.

Sign into your account to read the rest of this article. »

Share this on Twitter  |  Share this on Facebook  |  Email to a friend.  |  Contact the editor.

What are your thoughts?

Want to read more of this article?

You must be a subscriber to read entire articles.

Gain 24/7 access to all the content on this website by becoming a subscriber.
Choose your subscription plan and get full access in minutes. Subscribe now. »

If you are already a subscriber, sign in now to read more full articles.

More History News

Nine Dubious Victorian Cures

10 Interesting Things You Didn’t Know About American History

Alfred the Great Saved England

Survival Food the Mountain Men Ate

The Real Fruit of Democratic Policies and Our Native Americans

15 Free-But-Forgotten Ways Our Ancestors Stayed Warm During Winter

A Return to a Modest, Moral, Mannerly America!

Lincoln, the Movie: A Review

Stuyvesant and Van der Doncke

The Sad History of U.S. Peace Negotiations