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Hoover's Dam Folly

Written By: Doug French  |  Posted: Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

Economics professor Bernard Malamud not once but twice invited the crowd in Las Vegas to visit nearby Hoover Dam to see for themselves an example of the productive assets that were created by Franklin Delano Roosevelt's (FDR) New Deal. Professor Malamud was recruited to plead the Keynesian side of the argument in an "FDR's Depression Policies: Good Deal or Raw Deal?" debate with the Foundation for Economic Education's (FEE) Lawrence Reed during FreedomFest.

I finished my masters degree from UNLV under the tutelage of Murray Rothbard but I started my coursework with a class or two from professor Malamud, who, while being as Keynesian as they come, is at least sympathetic to the Austrian view when it comes to explaining speculative bubbles. He certainly took on Mr. Reed with good humor in front of an unfriendly, anti-FDR audience.

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